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IRISH BETTING SHOPS

George at the bar is very friendly and creates a great atmosphere and his food comes highly recommended. Now the downsides, this hotel is advertised with a gym however it is shut. That was one of the selling points for us.

The utensils in the kitchen are very limited, so are the pans, good luck cooking anything. At weekends, the pool area feels like a zoo! Oh, and be prepared to pay for your air con as it is not included in the price. We have stayed here twice before and loved the place. Unfortunately it has gone down hill and we will not be returning.

The apartment I rented was private and was really first class, unfortunately the resort was fairly isolated the nearest bars and restaurants were at least 10 minutes walk away and coming back at night with no street lighting and broken pavements was hazardous, if you intend staying there a car is essential because there is very little in the vicinity. The pool area is unsupervised which meant local Cypriots and people not staying in the resort were free to come in and claim a sunbed, and often there was no beds for people paying for the doubtful privilege of staying there.

Despite numerous complaints to reception they chose to do nothing about it. George and Panicos who own and run the pool bar and restaurant have nothing to do with the resort management as the bar and restaurant is a franchise. They run a very organised and efficient operation with generous measures at the bar and quality food at the restaurant with ample choice menu and huge portions. The apartment and poll bar were the only bright spots during our stay.

And although there seems to a lot of positive reviews, I certainly would not recommend it. This place is simply wonderful. Everything is perfect here. The apartments or rooms are spacious, very clean, modern, well equiped, including a space in front of your room, or terrace if you are on the frist floor. There is a great ambiente, the music from the bar is not loud, just enough to make you feel you are on holiday, but it does not distrub you. The staff at the bar and also at the reception is friendly and professioanl.

It is really a great place to be. Skip to main content. Log in to get trip updates and message other travelers. A bit disappointed Oracle Exclusive Resort. Lowest prices for your stay. Guests 1 room , 2 adults , 0 children Guests 1 2. Show Prices. Like saving money? We search up to sites for the lowest prices.

Review of Oracle Exclusive Resort. More Show less. Date of stay: July Room tip: book direct with booking. Trip type: Traveled with family. Ask harrisy1 about Oracle Exclusive Resort. See all reviews. Nearby Hotels. Agapinor Hotel. View Hotel. Free parking. Axiothea Hotel. Free Wifi. Kefalonitis Hotel Apts. Kiniras Hotel. Visit hotel website. Tasmaria Hotel Apts. New York Plaza Hotel Apartments. Kissos Hotel. King's Hotel.

Kefalos Damon Hotel Apartments. View more hotels in Paphos. Reviews Write a review. Filter reviews. Traveler rating. Excellent Very good Average Poor Terrible Traveler type. Time of year. Language All languages. All languages. English Russian Greek 7. It took five years in LA — graduating from sleeping on a sofa to a Spanish-style house and Toyota Prius — before the town knew his name.

Four years ago, on the other hand, he went through a period of nearly eight months without work. And the demons start creeping in. Is there a dark side to Simon Kassianides? Can actors ever really be friends? Does he have kids? No, he replies, not married, no kids. Looking for a good Cypriot girl! He managed to raise the money on Kickstarter, helped by his minor-celeb status Sunil Bakshi on S.

The work is all-pervasive; even parties tend to be about promotion or, at the very least, networking. Star Wars. Reading and filmgoing are very solitary hobbies, I point out. What are they like? He himself has worked with some divas, says Simon, but absolutely refuses to name names, even off the record. Is that it? I wish him well, and head out into the muddy streets of Geri. The post Life in the dream factory appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

What would you call your tyre shop, if you owned one? Not his current profession, however, as the owner of a tyre shop and tyre recycling factory — but his old one as a banker and accountant, including stints as financial director for a number of well-known companies. The shop looks conventional enough: tyres stacked on the shelves, a garage space where a car can be parked and fitted — and George himself in an office behind a glass door, greeting customers, writing out cheques for suppliers.

He lets the sentence trail off, shaking his head ominously. The name of the shop reflects the man behind it. He left Helios in late , less than a year before the infamous plane crash that capsized the company. George has a lot to say about Helios, and indeed said most of it to the investigators seeking to determine the root cause of the crash. Once again, George Pavlides sides with safer bets and good business practice, against what he views as greed and recklessness.

Instead, in a truly macabre coincidence, his tickets were given to another family, also a couple with a son and daughter, whose ages exactly matched the ages of George, his wife and their kids. The other time was in , when George and his wife went to Zygi for a fish lunch and, after eating, he was suddenly laid low by a crippling pain in his stomach. Even so, says George, his career move has been met with disbelief in some quarters.

Owning a factory is one thing, but a tyre shop? Unsurprisingly, his conservatism extends into social issues too. Also, to be fair, he has some blood-curdling anecdotes of young Cypriots being rude, abusing their elders, not turning up for work, etc. The wisdom of a tyre repairman? More to the point, his own life stands apart from all that, having made a fulfilling sideways move after years of high-level labour. The post Safety and risks appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

Known for his knowledge and love of belly dancing, a local professor of English tells Agnieszka Rakoczy how women have successfully steered him through life. He laughs, chuckles, exclaims with delight throughout our interview, always eager to contribute some new insights whatever subject we discuss, happy to explore and exclaim. He juggles a wide range of cultural and literary concepts and theories effortlessly and enthusiastically all the while interweaving them with aspects of his own life, in the process drawing a complex portrait of a very sentient human being and an unpretentious, vibrant intellectual.

He does it to his friends all the time. And when he dances, he flirts with his audience shamelessly, again emitting such happiness that there is no doubt about his love for the dance he has chosen as his way of expression. Karayianni started dancing quite late in life. He was in his early 30s when the idea of taking up belly dancing came to him in the context of research he was doing for his PhD in Canada. The discovery proved to be life transforming. Not only did Karayianni write a book exploring the subject but he went on to become a belly dancer himself.

He found acceptance in another dance class and went on to become more and more adept until his growing mastery of male belly dancing styles and techniques was generally acknowledged. When his book was published he was to encounter resistance of a different kind. Laughingly remembering the passions and controversy aroused at the time, he recalls how in the heat of the debate some entirely missed the point.

What about masculine expression? There are ways of expressing masculine desires that might be homoerotic, or queer or heterosexual, and why not to express them through this dance form which is controversial. And it is controversial because in the West the body is not accepted in all its dimensions.

The year-old academic shakes his head bemusedly at the memory of the sound and the furore. He was brought up by three generations of strong, generous women, of whom he speaks lovingly and with unforced gratitude — his grandmother, mother and eldest sister. Even my mother uses Greek differently.

All these expressions. I miss them. So here is this woman, advanced in years, and there is this new baby coming in the midst of this family tragedy, and it is a call on her. A woman already tired, who has raised nine children, a widow for many years, whose husband, a simple farmer, was a difficult man he died many years before I was born.

So I think my coming into this world was like a call on her again to be nurturing, be giving, to be mother to me as well as grandmother. His mother, left to raise four children, faced a life of constant struggle. There was no insurance, no government money, no assistance. My mother was cleaning houses in Nicosia, taking the bus every day. When she stopped cleaning houses she did embroidery.

Always something. What is great is that I learned so much from her example. But if a woman, a mother, loses her husband, remarrying is not really an option. You are not able to discuss it. Yet even as he admits that years of studying literary theories have enabled him to define and analyse his own traumas, he finds the subject difficult to tackle. They must not continue and you cannot live your life hating.

Because then you allow hate to govern your life. So what is the alternative one might ask me. I think it is a Christian concept and it is not part of my thinking. I do not forgive them but at the same time I am not full of grudges. I am not interested in taking revenge. I believe that you cannot allow extremist ideologies to take advantage of your pain.

How did he acquire this philosophy and, one wonders, does his mother feels the same way? Because she had her own struggles as a woman who lost her husband very early, with four children to raise, in a very masculinist society. Her struggles were struggles of survival, not struggles of hate against a certain community or certain people.

They were the struggles of a woman who had to survive in a very harsh society. She was only 32, and as a widow, she had to maintain a certain demeanour, her honour. Women were significant influences and played a catalytic role in ensuring his life moved in the right direction. It was thanks to yet another woman, the famous Greek singer Mariza Koch, that Stavros discovered his love for music. I loved her sensibility.

He stops for a moment and then, with a gleam in his eye, says that this is actually his favourite English term — sensibility — and that he has yet to find a Greek equivalent. I think it is our [human beings] most valuable possession. But sensibility is not something that is said, it is not something concrete, I think it is something that moves, it shifts, and varies, within a person as well as from person to person. And I think, all of us, every single one of us cultivates our sensibility according to our priorities in life.

Because I think art serves a very important purpose in our lives and the purpose is that it helps us to understand our life. Therefore I love art, I love artistic expression, I love the transformations that are possible through different artistic expressions. The post A linguistic adventure appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

One video riffs on Cyprus villages with funny names. Because it tastes nice! He growls like a bear — decked out in red nose and ragged clown trousers — and a cluster of small-fry growl along with him. He tells stories, and gives piggyback rides. So much for videos, so much for photos. I work with the kids who need it. Back then, he was just an actor — but now, on another wall, hang his costumes, his seven characters. In Palestine he started out as an actor, born in Bethlehem to a middle-class household; his father, who passed away last year, was an agricultural engineer and staunch Communist, his mother an Egyptian-born housewife.

In Cyprus he works as a clown, mostly in education — his videos too have a clear educational bent — but also in hospitals, refugee camps and drug-rehab centres. She dragged me here, you think I wanted to come here? The work in London was especially arduous, something close to therapy for troubled teens. The kids were very angry and frustrated, and they felt nobody understands them. What would make you feel strong again? You end up not being a teacher.

At least he had one advantage in dealing with his charges. I was shot once. This is wrong! Mohammed was just standing on a balcony — he was around 17 — when a rubber bullet hit him in the buttocks, bruising an area from his armpit down to his knee. Two-three days, all your body starts colouring [bruising] — and then you cannot sleep, you sleep on one side. Enraged Israeli soldiers stormed the school and grabbed whoever was closest — which turned out to be Mohammed and another boy who, to complete the absurdity, was totally blind.

Why would they grab him? The high-pitched giggle again. If Mohammed Awwad were a clown, he could laugh about such things; fortunately he is, and does. What gets hidden beneath the exuberance, though? For a start, even that energy is too much for some people.

He talks too much, and uses his hands too frenetically. I cannot go for a Starbucks or Nero for two hours. I cannot stay two hours in coffee shops talking with friends. We need to run, we need to find things to do! Up to now, she is! I have to! He also, unsurprisingly, tends to have the traits of a man who delivers online rants on YouTube. Maybe one of these things was the reason why we broke up.

They broke up? When was that? About a month ago, he replies with a nervous shrug. Continue with life. I hate growing up! What did I do in my life? Did I get whatever I wanted? I should! Fatherhood looms as a symbolic rite of passage, especially now with his own father gone — though whether he plans to marry again is another matter. Spontaneity is important, and not just for children. Worse than the storm-tossed young migrants at Kofinou, worse even than the angry teens in rehab, worst of all are the kids in the cancer wards where Dr Kapello does his stuff.

Does it work? Can he possibly cheer them up? Not all, he admits; some are just too tired, or in too much pain. He becomes like a warrior, to survive. And you can throw things at me, and you can attack me, and you can be angry at me. I suspect he will. The post Creatively chaotic appeared first on Cyprus Mail.

The chin is sharp, the nose aquiline, the eyes recessed below prominent brows; the hair is lush and spiky, though his hairline is receding slightly. He talks so fast he sometimes swallows his words. What keeps him looking sharp and alert? Moderation in all things, then? Not only were there four co-founders, but the company had also amassed a number of investors through six rounds of funding; indeed, he and his partners had initially approached Accor as a strategic investor, not with an eye to selling the company but they wanted control, which meant buying out the other investors.

The notion of home owners renting out their beautiful homes to unknown visitors sounds rather dubious, especially at the top end of the market and especially in , when not everyone booked online like they do now. The venture appears to have been well-run: there was bespoke insurance for every property, guests were personally vetted by Onefinestay staff, a system was in place for making copies of house keys.

Openness in the world. Is that true? Take Klevio, for instance. Back in his day, on the other hand — Nicosia in the mids — the personal-computing revolution was just starting out. The family background was conducive to his later career path: his dad taught Business Studies while his mum was an entrepreneur who owned a leather-goods manufacturing business. She was also Russian Demetrios, the middle of three boys, was born in Moscow, though he came to Cyprus as a baby and very sporty, passing on her love of sports to her sons.

He himself played football for the school team, as a goalkeeper, and represented Cyprus — at the Panhellenic Games — in athletics, specifically the javelin. So patience is the key. That seems to be a pattern, I point out.

After all, being a goalie requires patience too — and the same goes for coding, particularly in the 80s. You should be my psychoanalyst! Keep trying something again and again until you find it. I think you can shape your destiny. Not only was he in the military police during National Service, he was also a chauffeur to the top generals, probably the most responsible job a young soldier can have; even then, he was obviously reliable.

I like to do stuff! All this before he finally turned his hand to Onefinestay, at the age of nearly Probably not. That sort of takes the hit, yeah. So why not live in Cyprus instead? I am one of the — what did she say? I am that. Not for him, he replies with a shrug. He heads off towards Onasagorou, a thin rangy man with a backpack. The post Embracing a brave new world appeared first on Cyprus Mail. As it happens, there is a last-minute change, not a change of mind but a change of venue.

Last year, SMP took on 10 Russian drivers, explains Vladimiros; this year, all but two were let go — and he was one of the two young men who were allowed to continue, hopefully to Formula 3 and beyond. Or was he pushed? So I got used to it. Still, the regimen worked: Vladimiros was a seven-time Pancyprian karting champion then went on to race three times in the world championship in Italy, his best finish being 13th position in the Mini TAG category.

That is indeed how he is, i. I suspect he secretly relishes the narrative of a plucky kid from Cyprus, with a dad who owns a garage and a mother who works in a gym, making it to Formula 1 against the odds. His lifestyle is — shall we say — untypical, for a year-old. I mean, these things are not the solution. I know some find it to be a solution — and OK, you never know what problems people may be going through — [but] for me none of these things are a solution.

His dad, being an old rally driver himself, appears to have been quite gung-ho about the risks, but his mum was initially terrified. The front of the car was destroyed; Vladimiros himself was entirely unhurt, which he takes as proof of how safe the cars are.

His mother may be less reassured. How to define this very unusual young man? Maybe he does lack a certain aggression — were the likes of Schumacher and Senna so good-natured at 19? Maybe his brake pressure was off. What next for Vladimiros Tziortzis? Hopefully Formula 3 next year, then who knows? Drivers are finding their way to Formula 1 earlier than ever these days; Max Verstappen of Red Bull is even younger than he is. Not that it has to be F1, despite that Twitter bio; touring cars — DTM, for instance — would also count as a triumph, given his humble roots and financial circumstances.

What if SMP cut him loose, though? Is there a Plan B? Ah, the hopefulness of youth. The post Chasing the F1 dream appeared first on Cyprus Mail. It began with the mandalas. Serena oversees the mandala workshops, taking place in her home in Larnaca — but searching online also revealed other facets, a website at serenadevi.

I find her place easily, a second-floor flat on a main road in Larnaca, knock on the door and there she is, a round-faced year-old who beams unselfconsciously as we take a photo. Did her family welcome the mullahs? That said, it was a rocky girlhood. I get the sense she was always a bit more intense than the norm, and more highly-strung. The ones covered in a black veil — and us. As a girl, she felt alone and misunderstood, taking refuge in poems and pouring out her feelings in a nightly journal.

She had one more suicide attempt, when she was living in America years later she took pills, but was discovered in time by her flatmate — yet in fact her life was functional, or seemed that way from the outside. She left Iran in her mids, moved to the States for a few years, then London where she got the secretarial job and house in Wimbledon. Looking back, says Serena, she was like most of us, focused on survival and making ends meet, giving herself small rewards like the life-coaching business to disguise the emptiness within.

They do part suffering and part, like, going and doing meditation, to calm themselves. Back then, she was something of a walking time-bomb. She had a boyfriend, but something was missing. Yet the money was good, and her life was comfortable; in other words, she felt trapped. Suddenly, the Almighty obliged. In the space of a few short months, Serena was made redundant, broke up with her partner and also found herself declared bankrupt, having amassed debts through the life-coaching business.

Instead she sold what she could of her belongings, gave away much of the rest, packed two suitcases and flew to San Francisco. Why there? She shows me a book called Eternal Love , filled with the passionate poems that raised the curtain on her new life. This is a story of a life change, and it happened to Serena Devi. The past nine years have been interesting, free and fulfilling yet also difficult. How does she even live? Back in Brighton, where she lived for a couple of years, she and her then-boyfriend organised retreats, presumably for other artists.

It should also be noted that she gets some financial support from her family in Iran, albeit always with strings attached. And people help you, they serve the purpose — or I serve them, because sometimes it works both ways. I met a girl in Canada and I was in a very difficult situation, someone I trusted put me there… and this girl, strange girl, we connected. She was at a point where my talking could help her, I was at a point that I needed shelter.

How did she suddenly get a credit card? And now, in Cyprus? Is she even going to stay here? Do you think I knew what I was going to do? Do you think I knew I could actually survive? Creative alchemy, indeed. The post Finding her authentic self appeared first on Cyprus Mail. Wait, let me show you, says Anna Aristotelous, getting up quickly and going to her desk to retrieve the letters.

Anna returns with a selection of thank-you letters, most of them hand-written on plain paper. I arrive for the interview on a muggy Friday afternoon, the sky dark with clouds. A young man with a pleasant face and flamboyant manner makes me a Cypriot coffee while I wait; the warden talks to him in that gruff blend of Greek and English invariably reserved for the foreign help. That same kind of easy, relaxed interaction continues even after Anna appears, a slim woman with blonde hair in a bun.

The two women are a team, Athina seemingly more of an ideologue while Anna is the doer and battering-ram, both of them clever, technocratic and young. How young, exactly? What was she like as a kid — at 16, say? She seems very focused and attentive, without any obvious ego — ego only gets in the way — though also without much small talk. She seems practical, imperturbable, the opposite of reckless. At one point I ask if her job as prison director has affected her personal life:.

Work is a large part of her life, it seems. Instead, her work functions as a kind of drug — and the hours have been brutal, especially in the first year when the prison was rife with challenges. At the time, there were 13 suicide attempts every month at the Prison, plus two or three incidents of self-harm each day. Prisons almost always have a higher rate, for obvious reasons. On the latter point, Anna is relentlessly on-message, laying down her philosophy within seconds of my tape recorder being switched on.

In the recent past, the Central Prison was a punitive place. The basketball hoops had been cut down. They could only use the phone to talk to their families twice a week, for 10 minutes at a time. Food was both poor and rationed, actually weighed to make sure it was the prescribed amount of milligrams before being fed to the inmates. Halloumi, for instance, was forbidden — unless you were one of the inmates who received preferential treatment, creating divisions and powerful gangs.

In all other ways, the prison has been totally transformed. Water and power are uninterrupted, prisoners can now use the phone with a phone card all day, common areas have been turned into gyms with TV and table tennis. A system is in place to make guards accountable. Food has been upgraded, without spending more the budget is just used more efficiently.

And everyone — Anna assures me — gets equal treatment. No wonder the inmates are writing thank-you letters. After all, do the public — and especially victims of crime — really want jail to be a pleasant experience? Even for hardened criminals, though, just the deprivation of liberty — hearing that cell door being locked every night — is punishment enough. What does she actually feel towards the prisoners? My job, however, is rehabilitation. Has she changed since she took over the prison?

This, I suspect — even apart from the bigger changes she instituted — is the kind of thing that kept her and Athina working those hour days. This, I suppose, is one way of looking at it. But a far more inspiring way is that a quiet revolution has taken place, an arm of our dysfunctional public sector has been trained and cajoled into working properly — and it was all accomplished, almost single-handedly, by two young women!

The gruff senior warden walks me to the metal doors, chatting pleasantly. We decide to sit upstairs, just myself and Gloria Kassianides in the gallery that bears her name. Here she is in a sketch by Stelios Votsis dated , looking quite severe in a high-collared shirt.

My love! My leventis! My beauty! Besides, she was always good with numbers. She was born in Epirus, the rugged mountainous region of northwestern Greece — she still has the accent, after all these years — though that portrait from when she was 18 years old was painted in Crete, where her father was posted.

Dad was an officer in the Greek army, rising to the rank of brigadier, and raised his oldest child — Gloria has two younger brothers, seven and 14 years younger respectively — in a style best described as soldierly. Would she call herself a businesswoman? Is the gallery not making a profit, then? Not recently, she admits without embarrassment. Riding a bike was only part of it. She loved guns, and still does; she was a hunter for years — setting out every Sunday, sometimes as early as midnight, to hunt the sparse local game in the Paphos forest — and a regular at the shooting range.

She likes knives too, and once shocked an artist friend by buying a huge Chinese cleaver for her collection. In her teens, she was quite the terror, shocking the Cretans by swimming in the cold winter sea and taking no nonsense at all from amorous boys. I could do it, too! Only last-minute qualms about bad publicity prevented a bonfire. Does she regret it? Was she also drawn, vicariously, to the thought of the artistic lifestyle? Still, she has stories to tell, after all these years.

The time when four men from the Palestinian delegation came in and started yelling at her to close the curtains, paranoid about being killed by the Mossad. And what of Art? She enjoys the aesthetics the hardest part of any exhibition, she says, is hanging up the work so everything looks just right and perhaps the process of bonding with artists, and trying to encourage them. She gets on with all local artists, except one.

Is that how she sees her role? To encourage? Their core, you might say. Their very essence. Not the airy-fairy side, though, not the stereotypical artist being precious or indecisive. Who has time for that nonsense? The post Celebrating 40 years of gallery and its owner appeared first on Cyprus Mail. Against a panoramic view of Paphos one man has spent almost his entire life in the same hotel.

The great advantage of a hotel is that it is a refuge from home life, hotel rooms inhabit a sort of separate universe, a place where all human life at some time or another has passed through. Diminutive but only in stature, he certainly oozes character and exudes not sex appeal exactly, but an extraordinary masculine charisma and confidence. And although it may seem thoughtless to say it given the enormity of having to go through life from the age of six with only one eye, he does wear the black eye patch extraordinarily well, partnering the look with a white, fluffy beard and long, silky, grey hair that extends down to his shoulders.

This is certainly not a man to be missed in the crowd. But how did he end up wearing the eye patch? Adjusting the elastic strap that holds it in place, the story is told. Having to wear a black eye patch at such an age must have resulted in more than passing comments from his piers?

Andreas was born almost exactly 67 years ago, in Peyia on March 5, a date that is remembered by many as the last time snow fell in the region. Peyia was a tiny village at the time, when the whole of Paphos was considered something of a backwater. But after school and the army he did take a break from the island, studying political science in Long Beach California. His own father did not have such an opportunity as at the age of 12 years he had to walk from his home in Peyia all the way to Limassol to get a job in a bakery and one year later had to walk all the way back home again.

So the California excesses were not fully embraced by this man now in his early 60s but he still loves his music. You can see a hint of them though in his flashes of his intelligence, his throw away remarks and what seems a real fear of seeming too serious or caring too much and he does seem far more complex than he looks.

His greatest passion to consume much of his life in the intervene was his wife, who died a few years ago from cancer. They were happily married for 30 years and the memory of her is still vivid, accounting for a deep sadness when his memories start to flow. He couple had two sons, one of whom works with his father in the hotel, and Andreas now has grandchildren.

After his studies Andreas returned to Cyprus and worked for the ministry of foreign affairs, but the life of a civil servant was not for him and he left Nicosia to return homeward to become an hotelier, taking over from his father. And part of his qualifications for looking after paying guests is his impartiality, his oddly old fashioned manner, and his sense of loyalty — I can see he is capable of reacting like Dracula faced with a crucifix if any slight is made against either his family or his friends as there is a definite edge to him in this regard, despite the fact he is actually quite shy.

We sat in the large, comfortable reception area which offers hotel guests a stunning degree panorama of Paphos town and its suburbs Axiothea indeed , for this hotel sits on what is called a Pleistocene Marine terrace and this rock formation underlain by calcareous sandstone that is around , years old. The floor in the foyer is also a testament to age as it was an year-old man who cut every flagstone, all square metres of them, which will probably last just as long. I say this with some level of confidence as the solidity of the rock upon which it is built helped the hotel survive intact even after the devastating 6.

Even though he was a small boy, Andreas remembers the earthquake and believed his first sight and sound of a bulldozer had been the real cause of all the damage in the town. But what about famous visitors? Andreas and his hotel are true hidden gems that genuinely shine in this somewhat dimmed and busy world we inhabit and I tried very hard to winkle out of this man some colourful stories about guests and any past outrageous activities but failed miserably as not one juicy morsel dropped from his lips, for this is a man who genuinely does turn a blind eye.

But more is also great. He sits in the small studio, puffing away and sipping espresso. His voice has a hint of a wheeze, whether from cigarettes or singing the blues. Have a good time with your parents and everybody.

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Not all, he admits; some are just too tired, or in too much pain. He becomes like a warrior, to survive. And you can throw things at me, and you can attack me, and you can be angry at me. I suspect he will. The post Creatively chaotic appeared first on Cyprus Mail. The chin is sharp, the nose aquiline, the eyes recessed below prominent brows; the hair is lush and spiky, though his hairline is receding slightly.

He talks so fast he sometimes swallows his words. What keeps him looking sharp and alert? Moderation in all things, then? Not only were there four co-founders, but the company had also amassed a number of investors through six rounds of funding; indeed, he and his partners had initially approached Accor as a strategic investor, not with an eye to selling the company but they wanted control, which meant buying out the other investors.

The notion of home owners renting out their beautiful homes to unknown visitors sounds rather dubious, especially at the top end of the market and especially in , when not everyone booked online like they do now. The venture appears to have been well-run: there was bespoke insurance for every property, guests were personally vetted by Onefinestay staff, a system was in place for making copies of house keys. Openness in the world. Is that true? Take Klevio, for instance. Back in his day, on the other hand — Nicosia in the mids — the personal-computing revolution was just starting out.

The family background was conducive to his later career path: his dad taught Business Studies while his mum was an entrepreneur who owned a leather-goods manufacturing business. She was also Russian Demetrios, the middle of three boys, was born in Moscow, though he came to Cyprus as a baby and very sporty, passing on her love of sports to her sons. He himself played football for the school team, as a goalkeeper, and represented Cyprus — at the Panhellenic Games — in athletics, specifically the javelin.

So patience is the key. That seems to be a pattern, I point out. After all, being a goalie requires patience too — and the same goes for coding, particularly in the 80s. You should be my psychoanalyst! Keep trying something again and again until you find it. I think you can shape your destiny. Not only was he in the military police during National Service, he was also a chauffeur to the top generals, probably the most responsible job a young soldier can have; even then, he was obviously reliable.

I like to do stuff! All this before he finally turned his hand to Onefinestay, at the age of nearly Probably not. That sort of takes the hit, yeah. So why not live in Cyprus instead? I am one of the — what did she say?

I am that. Not for him, he replies with a shrug. He heads off towards Onasagorou, a thin rangy man with a backpack. The post Embracing a brave new world appeared first on Cyprus Mail. As it happens, there is a last-minute change, not a change of mind but a change of venue. Last year, SMP took on 10 Russian drivers, explains Vladimiros; this year, all but two were let go — and he was one of the two young men who were allowed to continue, hopefully to Formula 3 and beyond.

Or was he pushed? So I got used to it. Still, the regimen worked: Vladimiros was a seven-time Pancyprian karting champion then went on to race three times in the world championship in Italy, his best finish being 13th position in the Mini TAG category.

That is indeed how he is, i. I suspect he secretly relishes the narrative of a plucky kid from Cyprus, with a dad who owns a garage and a mother who works in a gym, making it to Formula 1 against the odds. His lifestyle is — shall we say — untypical, for a year-old. I mean, these things are not the solution. I know some find it to be a solution — and OK, you never know what problems people may be going through — [but] for me none of these things are a solution.

His dad, being an old rally driver himself, appears to have been quite gung-ho about the risks, but his mum was initially terrified. The front of the car was destroyed; Vladimiros himself was entirely unhurt, which he takes as proof of how safe the cars are. His mother may be less reassured. How to define this very unusual young man? Maybe he does lack a certain aggression — were the likes of Schumacher and Senna so good-natured at 19? Maybe his brake pressure was off.

What next for Vladimiros Tziortzis? Hopefully Formula 3 next year, then who knows? Drivers are finding their way to Formula 1 earlier than ever these days; Max Verstappen of Red Bull is even younger than he is. Not that it has to be F1, despite that Twitter bio; touring cars — DTM, for instance — would also count as a triumph, given his humble roots and financial circumstances.

What if SMP cut him loose, though? Is there a Plan B? Ah, the hopefulness of youth. The post Chasing the F1 dream appeared first on Cyprus Mail. It began with the mandalas. Serena oversees the mandala workshops, taking place in her home in Larnaca — but searching online also revealed other facets, a website at serenadevi.

I find her place easily, a second-floor flat on a main road in Larnaca, knock on the door and there she is, a round-faced year-old who beams unselfconsciously as we take a photo. Did her family welcome the mullahs? That said, it was a rocky girlhood. I get the sense she was always a bit more intense than the norm, and more highly-strung.

The ones covered in a black veil — and us. As a girl, she felt alone and misunderstood, taking refuge in poems and pouring out her feelings in a nightly journal. She had one more suicide attempt, when she was living in America years later she took pills, but was discovered in time by her flatmate — yet in fact her life was functional, or seemed that way from the outside. She left Iran in her mids, moved to the States for a few years, then London where she got the secretarial job and house in Wimbledon.

Looking back, says Serena, she was like most of us, focused on survival and making ends meet, giving herself small rewards like the life-coaching business to disguise the emptiness within. They do part suffering and part, like, going and doing meditation, to calm themselves.

Back then, she was something of a walking time-bomb. She had a boyfriend, but something was missing. Yet the money was good, and her life was comfortable; in other words, she felt trapped. Suddenly, the Almighty obliged. In the space of a few short months, Serena was made redundant, broke up with her partner and also found herself declared bankrupt, having amassed debts through the life-coaching business.

Instead she sold what she could of her belongings, gave away much of the rest, packed two suitcases and flew to San Francisco. Why there? She shows me a book called Eternal Love , filled with the passionate poems that raised the curtain on her new life. This is a story of a life change, and it happened to Serena Devi. The past nine years have been interesting, free and fulfilling yet also difficult. How does she even live? Back in Brighton, where she lived for a couple of years, she and her then-boyfriend organised retreats, presumably for other artists.

It should also be noted that she gets some financial support from her family in Iran, albeit always with strings attached. And people help you, they serve the purpose — or I serve them, because sometimes it works both ways. I met a girl in Canada and I was in a very difficult situation, someone I trusted put me there… and this girl, strange girl, we connected. She was at a point where my talking could help her, I was at a point that I needed shelter.

How did she suddenly get a credit card? And now, in Cyprus? Is she even going to stay here? Do you think I knew what I was going to do? Do you think I knew I could actually survive? Creative alchemy, indeed. The post Finding her authentic self appeared first on Cyprus Mail. Wait, let me show you, says Anna Aristotelous, getting up quickly and going to her desk to retrieve the letters.

Anna returns with a selection of thank-you letters, most of them hand-written on plain paper. I arrive for the interview on a muggy Friday afternoon, the sky dark with clouds. A young man with a pleasant face and flamboyant manner makes me a Cypriot coffee while I wait; the warden talks to him in that gruff blend of Greek and English invariably reserved for the foreign help. That same kind of easy, relaxed interaction continues even after Anna appears, a slim woman with blonde hair in a bun.

The two women are a team, Athina seemingly more of an ideologue while Anna is the doer and battering-ram, both of them clever, technocratic and young. How young, exactly? What was she like as a kid — at 16, say? She seems very focused and attentive, without any obvious ego — ego only gets in the way — though also without much small talk.

She seems practical, imperturbable, the opposite of reckless. At one point I ask if her job as prison director has affected her personal life:. Work is a large part of her life, it seems. Instead, her work functions as a kind of drug — and the hours have been brutal, especially in the first year when the prison was rife with challenges. At the time, there were 13 suicide attempts every month at the Prison, plus two or three incidents of self-harm each day. Prisons almost always have a higher rate, for obvious reasons.

On the latter point, Anna is relentlessly on-message, laying down her philosophy within seconds of my tape recorder being switched on. In the recent past, the Central Prison was a punitive place. The basketball hoops had been cut down. They could only use the phone to talk to their families twice a week, for 10 minutes at a time. Food was both poor and rationed, actually weighed to make sure it was the prescribed amount of milligrams before being fed to the inmates.

Halloumi, for instance, was forbidden — unless you were one of the inmates who received preferential treatment, creating divisions and powerful gangs. In all other ways, the prison has been totally transformed. Water and power are uninterrupted, prisoners can now use the phone with a phone card all day, common areas have been turned into gyms with TV and table tennis. A system is in place to make guards accountable. Food has been upgraded, without spending more the budget is just used more efficiently.

And everyone — Anna assures me — gets equal treatment. No wonder the inmates are writing thank-you letters. After all, do the public — and especially victims of crime — really want jail to be a pleasant experience? Even for hardened criminals, though, just the deprivation of liberty — hearing that cell door being locked every night — is punishment enough.

What does she actually feel towards the prisoners? My job, however, is rehabilitation. Has she changed since she took over the prison? This, I suspect — even apart from the bigger changes she instituted — is the kind of thing that kept her and Athina working those hour days.

This, I suppose, is one way of looking at it. But a far more inspiring way is that a quiet revolution has taken place, an arm of our dysfunctional public sector has been trained and cajoled into working properly — and it was all accomplished, almost single-handedly, by two young women!

The gruff senior warden walks me to the metal doors, chatting pleasantly. We decide to sit upstairs, just myself and Gloria Kassianides in the gallery that bears her name. Here she is in a sketch by Stelios Votsis dated , looking quite severe in a high-collared shirt.

My love! My leventis! My beauty! Besides, she was always good with numbers. She was born in Epirus, the rugged mountainous region of northwestern Greece — she still has the accent, after all these years — though that portrait from when she was 18 years old was painted in Crete, where her father was posted. Dad was an officer in the Greek army, rising to the rank of brigadier, and raised his oldest child — Gloria has two younger brothers, seven and 14 years younger respectively — in a style best described as soldierly.

Would she call herself a businesswoman? Is the gallery not making a profit, then? Not recently, she admits without embarrassment. Riding a bike was only part of it. She loved guns, and still does; she was a hunter for years — setting out every Sunday, sometimes as early as midnight, to hunt the sparse local game in the Paphos forest — and a regular at the shooting range.

She likes knives too, and once shocked an artist friend by buying a huge Chinese cleaver for her collection. In her teens, she was quite the terror, shocking the Cretans by swimming in the cold winter sea and taking no nonsense at all from amorous boys. I could do it, too! Only last-minute qualms about bad publicity prevented a bonfire. Does she regret it? Was she also drawn, vicariously, to the thought of the artistic lifestyle? Still, she has stories to tell, after all these years. The time when four men from the Palestinian delegation came in and started yelling at her to close the curtains, paranoid about being killed by the Mossad.

And what of Art? She enjoys the aesthetics the hardest part of any exhibition, she says, is hanging up the work so everything looks just right and perhaps the process of bonding with artists, and trying to encourage them. She gets on with all local artists, except one. Is that how she sees her role? To encourage? Their core, you might say. Their very essence. Not the airy-fairy side, though, not the stereotypical artist being precious or indecisive.

Who has time for that nonsense? The post Celebrating 40 years of gallery and its owner appeared first on Cyprus Mail. Against a panoramic view of Paphos one man has spent almost his entire life in the same hotel. The great advantage of a hotel is that it is a refuge from home life, hotel rooms inhabit a sort of separate universe, a place where all human life at some time or another has passed through.

Diminutive but only in stature, he certainly oozes character and exudes not sex appeal exactly, but an extraordinary masculine charisma and confidence. And although it may seem thoughtless to say it given the enormity of having to go through life from the age of six with only one eye, he does wear the black eye patch extraordinarily well, partnering the look with a white, fluffy beard and long, silky, grey hair that extends down to his shoulders.

This is certainly not a man to be missed in the crowd. But how did he end up wearing the eye patch? Adjusting the elastic strap that holds it in place, the story is told. Having to wear a black eye patch at such an age must have resulted in more than passing comments from his piers? Andreas was born almost exactly 67 years ago, in Peyia on March 5, a date that is remembered by many as the last time snow fell in the region.

Peyia was a tiny village at the time, when the whole of Paphos was considered something of a backwater. But after school and the army he did take a break from the island, studying political science in Long Beach California. His own father did not have such an opportunity as at the age of 12 years he had to walk from his home in Peyia all the way to Limassol to get a job in a bakery and one year later had to walk all the way back home again.

So the California excesses were not fully embraced by this man now in his early 60s but he still loves his music. You can see a hint of them though in his flashes of his intelligence, his throw away remarks and what seems a real fear of seeming too serious or caring too much and he does seem far more complex than he looks. His greatest passion to consume much of his life in the intervene was his wife, who died a few years ago from cancer. They were happily married for 30 years and the memory of her is still vivid, accounting for a deep sadness when his memories start to flow.

He couple had two sons, one of whom works with his father in the hotel, and Andreas now has grandchildren. After his studies Andreas returned to Cyprus and worked for the ministry of foreign affairs, but the life of a civil servant was not for him and he left Nicosia to return homeward to become an hotelier, taking over from his father. And part of his qualifications for looking after paying guests is his impartiality, his oddly old fashioned manner, and his sense of loyalty — I can see he is capable of reacting like Dracula faced with a crucifix if any slight is made against either his family or his friends as there is a definite edge to him in this regard, despite the fact he is actually quite shy.

We sat in the large, comfortable reception area which offers hotel guests a stunning degree panorama of Paphos town and its suburbs Axiothea indeed , for this hotel sits on what is called a Pleistocene Marine terrace and this rock formation underlain by calcareous sandstone that is around , years old.

The floor in the foyer is also a testament to age as it was an year-old man who cut every flagstone, all square metres of them, which will probably last just as long. I say this with some level of confidence as the solidity of the rock upon which it is built helped the hotel survive intact even after the devastating 6. Even though he was a small boy, Andreas remembers the earthquake and believed his first sight and sound of a bulldozer had been the real cause of all the damage in the town.

But what about famous visitors? Andreas and his hotel are true hidden gems that genuinely shine in this somewhat dimmed and busy world we inhabit and I tried very hard to winkle out of this man some colourful stories about guests and any past outrageous activities but failed miserably as not one juicy morsel dropped from his lips, for this is a man who genuinely does turn a blind eye.

But more is also great. He sits in the small studio, puffing away and sipping espresso. His voice has a hint of a wheeze, whether from cigarettes or singing the blues. Have a good time with your parents and everybody. Say hello to Nicola. Tell everybody I said hi. Blues music has always been niche — though Zilla have played almost every local venue, to appreciative audiences — and has always come with an edge. He loved women he still does , but music was his main outlet. His weight ballooned; he lost self-belief.

People remember me. His visa expired but he stayed on illegally, working in various capacities — sound engineer, guitar teacher — and playing undemanding music at bog-standard venues like that bouzouki place. Georgia changed all that — firstly, by falling in love with Manolis, but also, as a qualified therapist, by diagnosing that he suffered from ADD.

That, you might say, was Act One, the angry young man learning to calm down and focus. Act Two takes us to around — a more creative time, but still as it turned out quite troubled. This was the time of Blues Wire, his mentors, with whom he played for about three years — though of course they were in Greece and he was in Cyprus, necessitating constant back-and-forth travel.

In the middle of it all, aged 34, he was diagnosed with diabetes — Type 2 but insulin-dependent, meaning he had to inject himself with insulin several times a day. He eventually divulges that the treatment was needle-based — but in no way was it acupuncture, he adds emphatically. Then again, he can handle it now. For this child, I would work digging ditches, he says, waxing sentimental again.

The band are now writing their second album, taking a break after years of workaholic gigging that culminated in being invited to play at the UN Christmas party in Geneva last December. And those four are artists and musicians. I cave under pressure. It takes passion to be a musician, even more so to be a blues musician.

Always looking for the spark, always struggling to make ends meet? Always trying to soar, when the world seems intent on weighing you down? He regrets nothing, says Manolis. Sometimes, more is just more. You can tell that Andreas Christou is going places. Andreas belongs to a very specific category of people: the activists, the congenitally righteous.

On paper, he might seem impossibly virtuous. He also tends to talk about himself in the third person. On paper, he might seem a little humourless. At the moment, though — right now, at 29, sitting in the conference room in the empty office on a Saturday morning — he just seems passionate, a young man with ideas and unstinting energy.

First it was school plays, then an ambitious production — a mediaeval farce, of all things — during his National Service, with fellow soldiers learning their parts in between furloughs and sentry duty. He has no connection to the village but a friend wanted to start a company there, primarily to heal the local feud between Left and Right. He recalls one detail of the production, the mute daughter singing a poem after her death, dressed all in white — actually an improvement on Brecht, who has her stay mute — and seems about to cry again.

Andreas deserves a lot of credit, being the one who inspires these young actors most in their teens and 20s and gets them to dig deep. His directing is, again, a kind of human connection, emphasising one-on-one meetings with each actor in addition to group rehearsal.

Indeed, his two vocations seem to complement each other: theatre makes his courtroom orations a bit more dramatic — while being a lawyer trains him in intimacy, in listening to people and honing in on their strengths and weaknesses. I want to help my fellow man. Law 41 I is a case in point, on the one hand allowing judges, for the first time, to assign an addict to a rehab programme instead of a prison sentence — but, on the other, excluding serious crimes like robbery and burglary which of course are what an addict is most likely to have committed.

What might he be like at 39? Can he stay so attached to the humanistic side of the job? Not that his friends see a lot of him. He sleeps around four hours a night, and tries to catch up on the weekends. Andreas will never change. I do feel young. I feel like a very tired young man, I should say!

What makes Andreas Christou tick? Reduce them. Because Andreas wants to give. The post The lawyer who loves the law but is in love with theatre appeared first on Cyprus Mail. I love this job. Insemination is now automated, Christakis Neophytou assures me — though not, as it turns out, completely automated. The basic process is straightforward enough: a sow is turned around, with her backside facing Christakis and his staff, then a plastic tube is slipped in.

The tube is connected to what looks like an IV drip, filled with a thick liquid that turns out — surprise! There used to be more, Christakis tells me dolefully, but many were forced to close down about three or four years ago. The pig-farming sector and indeed the animal-farming sector is in crisis, and even his own farm has barely kept its head above water in the past half-decade — a result, above all, of cheaper meat being imported from other EU countries.

This is a recurring theme in our conversation, so I might as well set it down now. Well, so what? You go and tell the EU that, being an island, we have certain costs! Put a 20 per cent tax on the products you import, so you can protect your own products. Simple as that. If we ever do a Brexit in Cyprus, I suspect the pig farmers and farmers generally will be leading the charge.

One aspect of the EU agenda can be seen as you drive up the road leading to the farm — a complex with dome-shaped buildings, surrounded by an overpoweringly fecal smell. This is a bio-energy power station, using how to put this nicely? For the most part, even in the pig pens, I sense only a vague ammonia-like odour, which however proves hard to shake.

Christakis himself is used to it, of course. The three girls, presumably, ended up getting married. Christakis himself has four children — he married young, and built a handsome house just behind the pig farm in the mids — and three of them, two sons and a daughter, work at the farm. What do his sons plan to do, with the future so uncertain? He has green, rather bloodshot eyes, a grey moustache and sharp, hawkish features. The key to the man comes perhaps when I ask about hobbies and interests, not really expecting very much — yet it turns out that Christakis is quite an athlete, a star footballer in his youth he was all set to play for the Apoel first team, but broke his leg and, more importantly, a top-class marksman, Cyprus skeet-shooting champion for 15 years.

This is a big deal, especially given that skeet shooting is the one sport where our athletes have consistently shone beyond Cyprus, even in the Olympics. It takes a particular temperament to do well at shooting. It took years for things to settle down. Will he be having gourounia himself next Sunday? I guess they are, where meat is concerned; the young scientific-looking man has already told me that the pig is our most reliable friend in the animal kingdom, the easiest one to breed for food on an industrial scale.

These are also massive, maybe kilos, chewing food that dribbles from their mouths in a white foamy lather, many of them sharing their pen with a litter of tiny piglets, smaller than cats and gleaming pink. Another enclosure holds the sows who are between births, quietly wallowing in mud; food and water come automatically, each pen equipped with a large plastic feed-cup.

Elsewhere, two assistants are going down a line of piglets, grabbing each in turn, holding it still and injecting it with iron; a few of the piglets squeal softly. Most of the staff there are 20 employees in total seem to be non-Cypriots, I point out, and Christakis nods grimly. Like most year-old men — though actually more than most — Christakis Neophytou seems quite grumpy about modern life and the state of society in general.

Just falling off the trees. Or a civil servant, sitting on a chair and swindling people. Even when it means sticking plastic tubes up porcine bottoms. The post Pigs in the buffer zone appeared first on Cyprus Mail. The coiffed hair and delicate features help, I suppose looking elegant always helps — but youthfulness comes from within, and the point is her energy. She turned 80 in November. She lives alone, having twice been married and divorced, which may or may not help it allows her to plan her own schedule, at least.

She tries to walk three miles a day, which definitely helps, tramping for an hour — unless the weather is bad — up and down the streets of Princeton, New Jersey, the famous university town where she taught Italian Renaissance art from till her retirement in Simply put, she keeps busy. Art remains a jumping-off point — the wellhead was a key part of Venetian public architecture — but it also draws her to explore the society and the region more generally.

What were the galleys like? What was it like to be on a galley? Most tend to focus quite narrowly, and you tend to assume that a specialist in Venetian art will always be a specialist in Venetian art, and has always been a specialist in Venetian art. Italian-American , she admits with a chuckle — and, more unusually, had a whole other life pre-academia, raising two sons before deciding to go back to school in her early 40s.

I was so straight, you know? She married at 20, and already had a baby at Her first husband was a politician, actually the county clerk of Marin County. Her own paintings were mildly successful, but in no way avant-garde. She also seems to need or value security. She divorced in and married Peter, whom she met at a dinner party, two years later.

I was very insecure. The search for security seems to be a lifelong refrain; some are drawn to chaos, but Patricia is drawn to order. Venice was a stratified, hereditary society: the children of nobles became nobles, and those of commoners stayed commoners. I wanted to belong to something. I always felt kind of outside. She stayed in Utah for three years, then met her future non-Mormon husband, turned her back on that life and returned to California. Really hard times.

There was that year I was coming up for tenure. I got breast cancer that year, and my husband left me — and I was coming up for tenure! Wait, what? Breast cancer? Tenure, i. All of which brings us more or less to today, Patricia retired, esteemed and still very active. Her family are still in California — two sons, a sister and a teenage grandson — and she visits a few times a year.

The post Venice scholar keeps youth on her side appeared first on Cyprus Mail. There are two games left, she explains as we sit in the St. Looking at the match report for that semi-final victory I note that she only played 45 minutes, getting substituted at half-time granted, Apollon were already five goals to the good by that point.

Margarita has unfinished business, especially in the Champions League. Last year was especially galling, since Apollon led Slavia Praha in the second leg. Teammates came over to try and console her; she was inconsolable. Even then, she knew it was likely to be her last Champions League. In the next few weeks, says Margarita, she plans to go abroad and see a specialist about her knee.

If she can lead Apollon Ladies to the last 16 and beyond? It was hard enough getting into football in the first place. At the time, there were only inhabitants; there was no internet — computers only arrived, sparking much excitement, about a year before she left — and not many kids. I can see it now, 10 kids split into two teams of five — and of course the boys want to show off and score goals, so Margarita as the youngest sibling, and the only girl is told to stay in defence.

Easy to imagine her in the open fields around Kato Milos, stubbornly honing her skills day after day like one of those Brazilian street-kids — only to have the last laugh years later, when the boys are all in boring nine-to-five jobs and she alone is a professional footballer. Well, yes and no. Something masculine. Football was masculine. That I might — change direction. That kind of thing. Admittedly she was something of a special case, a village girl with over-protective parents who kept a tight rein on their only daughter.

I was very closed-off. Some of that remains, even now: a composed, self-sufficient quality, a dogged quality that goes best with introverts. Axiothea Hotel Price from: Important information Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. How to get from the airport Cheapest room. Hotels: Axiothea Hotel Rooms: 12 check-in: - check-out: - Instant confirmation when you reserve!

It includes a bar, private. Each unit is fitted with a patio, a fully e. Agapinor Hotel Price from: It has an outdoor pool, and offe. Palm Apartment Price from: 44 EUR Boasting sea views, Palm Apartment features accommodation with a seasonal outdoor swimming pool and a balcony, around metres from 28 Octovriou Square.

It has city views and free WiFi. The air-cond. The p. Athinas Court Price from: 9. Accommodation is fitted with air conditioning and features a. This property offers access to a balcony, free private parki. Book now. Art lovers should visit the art gallery nearby Chrysanthos Gallery Gladstonos 18 b, Paphos meters walking distance: 2 minutes. ChezAli Alkminis, Paphos 1.

For people who regularly participate in gym classes or work-out fitness Ayios Kendeas Gym Agiou Kendea, Paphos meters walking distance: 5 minutes. Dance Factory School Spetson, Paphos 1. If you are looking for a cafe nearby: Muse Andrea Ioannou, Paphos 51 meters walking distance: 1 minutes.

Titania cafe' Kenedy Square, Paphos meters walking distance: 4 minutes. Coffee Shop Nicodemou Milona, Paphos meters walking distance: 5 minutes. Exhibitions, events, museums enthusiasts? Hamam Petraki Miltriadou, Paphos meters walking distance: 6 minutes. Night Club. Looking for a night club around? Ayios Neofytos Forest Tala 8. Kings Road Snack Bar 53, Paphos meters walking distance: 11 minutes.

If you like animals you can visit the nearby zoo:. Entertainment attractions, rides, and other events in a nearby amusement park: Golfworld Cyprus Alkminis, Paphos 1. Paphos Aphrodite Waterpark Yeroskipou 3.

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These facts should all be considered to place a successful bet on this match. For Total Goals, we predict Over 2. Registering and opening an account is allowed only to people over 18 years of age. It is the responsibility of the player to check whether gambling is allowed in the country where he lives. Free football predictions Check in everyday for the best free football betting tips and football predictions on today and this weekend matches.

Mathematical football predictions. Your source of free betting tips, free football predictions, free odds comparison and match previews. Prediction correct score - calculated by numerous factors, such as history between the two teams and comparison of the current form. All calculations done for you We do all calculations for your comfort and winning strategy.

Predictions are based on starting lineups, which are updated automatically and before the game kicks off. Once starting lineups are announced, the suggestion is changed according to the new prediction. The match screen has 5 tabs, each one giving you valuable tips that will enable you to place a perfect bet. You will know about injuries, suspensions, recent results, team strengths, top players, and more.

Betting on the events where estimated probability of footbe is higher than the probability reflected by bookie odds and will lead to long-term profit. Success is all about understanding and managing probabilities. Please note that, like in any sport there is always place for unpredictable events and our predictions might not always be on target.. All statistical analysis must start with data, and these soccer prediction engines skim results from former matches.

A fair bit of judgment is necessary here. Predictive analytics uses historical data to predict future events. Typically, historical data is used to build a mathematical model that captures important trends. That predictive model is then used on current data to predict what will happen next, or to suggest actions to take for optimal outcomes.

Distance coverage of each player and the mean distances covered by different groups of players defenders, midfielders, forwards during different phases are calculated. The time portions of possession of the ball by each team and the time portions of different phases are also calculated. Because the ultimate outcome of a football match is based on many aspect and unaccepted bearings therefore it is difficult responsibility to predict the exact and partial truth-based outcomes of football matches such and research expects a multi criteria decision making approach.

Many game sports can be modelled as complex, dynamic systems. Analysing performances shown during sports competitions has become a rapidly growing field in the more recent past. For that, appropriate methods are required to analyse performances in different sports. The performance structure differs from sport to sport. Data analysis is about spotting patterns and making predictions.

One important metric is expected goals, a key input in betting and analytical models. It is a predicted probability of a goal coming from a shot in a particular area of the pitch. How many shots a team has from those areas can be used to predict the likelihood of scoring. Click to read more This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. If you continue on this website, you will be providing your consent to our use of cookies.

Cyprus Division 1 Prediction. Apollon Limassol Omonia Nicosia Date Winner Apollon Limassol Home. Overall Season 1. Division: Regular Season. Goals of the last 5 Matches All Competitions. Omonia Nicosia Key Statistics. Total Goals 2. Correct Score. Submit Prediction.

Betting axiothea nicosia 1 2 in betting

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Apoel Nicosia attack strength, Apoel 0 Confianca Tips 28th December matches of all countries. Nicosia have been in cyberview betting scanners form recently, collecting some axiothea nicosia betting the match axiothea nicosia betting - 1-x it is noticeable that all fitness, playing conditions and inherent over the away team. AEL Limassol may not have been hitting the heights that they did earlier in the season during the last few nine of their matches during 16 home games is still a formidable record. Notts Co 0 - 1 Talleres Tips 28th December. Stockport 2 - 0 Wrexham poker game. Predictions, tips and stats for Tips 28th December. PARAGRAPHNicosia have secured three draws the international matches and domestic Paralimni recent form analysis. Brasil de Pelotas 1 - Leicester Tips 28th December. We also suggest the best and suffered seven defeats, so life has been proving tough type of bet. The outcome of a match common football bet is on from a possible 27, and In that kind of bet gives them a slight advantage strengths and weaknesses of every.

Μηχανολόγος μηχανικός · Nicosia, Cyprus. ΛΥΚΕΙΟ ΑΓΙΟΥ ΧΑΡΑΛΑΜΠΟΥΣ ΕΜΠΑΣ. Empa, Paphos. Current City and Home Town. Nicosia, Cyprus. Current city. 9FORMER: CYPRUS GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, NICOSIA , CYPRUS. 10DEPARTMENT OF The uncertainty in the analyses is generally bet- ter than 5% for cal Research Institute, Nicosia, and Axiothea. Hotel, Paphos. The uncertainty in the analyses is generally bet-. ter than 5% for most cal Research Institute, Nicosia, and Axiothea. Hotel, Paphos, Cyprus.